Browse Items (673 total)

Daguerreotype of an unidentified girl, three-quarter length portrait facing front. She is seated in a chair and holding doll.

Albumen stereograph showing an exterior view of the site of the Libby Prison, a Confederate military prison near Richmond Virginia. This photograph was taken as a part of the series, 'Photographic History: The War for the Union.'

Political cartoon depicting Union soldiers in Andersonville prison compared with the rebel leader, Jeff Davis at Fortress Monroe. This wood engraving was completed by Thomas Nast, a German-born cartoonist, who would later become known for his…

Grounds at Andersonville, Georgia, where are buried fourteen thousand Union soldiers, who died in Andersonville Prison. Print of wood carving, which includes Clara Barton raising the national flag, August 17, 1865, in far background.

Reproduction of a photograph depicting Union Civil War prison, Camp Chase, Columbus, Ohio ca. 1860-1865.

The Union Army contracted with sutlers to sell goods such as stationery, toothbrushes, and combs to the prisoners at Johnson's Island Prison to supplement their often-meager rations. Prisoners were issued tickets as scrip to be used for transactions.…

There were several recorded escape attempts at Johnson's Island Prison. This ladder, constructed primarily of scrap wood and rope made from cloth, is believed to have been used during one escape attempt. It is approximately eight feet long. The…

This photograph depicts Hoffman's Battalion, the volunteer unit assigned to guard the Confederate prisoners at Johnson's Island. Hoffman's Battalion guarded the island from the Spring of 1832 until January 1864. At that time six more companies were…

This photograph depicts the commissioned officers of Hoffman's Battalion, the volunteer unit assigned to guard the Confederate prisoners at Johnson's Island Prison. Hoffman's Battalion guarded the island from the Spring of 1832 until January 1864.…

This watercolor drawing, painted on the back of an illegible letter, was created by an unknown Confederate prisoner held at Johnson's Island Prison. Prisoners were permitted to send and receive an unlimited number of letters, although the length was…